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Speaking Tips to get you an 8 or higher

Today’s tips: Speaking Part 3

There are three parts of the Speaking Section, and today we’ll be giving advice about Speaking Part 3.

For Speaking Part 3, the examiner will ask you several questions about one topic. For example:

How long should borrowing an object be allowed?

How about more luxurious things?

Are people afraid of borrowing and losing one of these objects?

Part 3 is the last part of the speaking test, so it’s important that this part sounds super strong.  If you do well on Part 3, your examiner will leave feeling confident that you deserve a high score.

Here are 4 tips to do well on Speaking Part 3:

1. If you don’t understand the question, you can ask for help.

On this part of the test, you can ask your examiner to rephrase the question if you don’t understand it. 

You can ask, “Would you be able to rephrase the question?”

However, if you feel confident that you heard the question correctly, go ahead and answer it!

2. Your answer should be about 3 or 4 sentences long.

It’s important that your answer is 3 or 4 sentences long.

That means that you can’t give a short, 1-sentence answer with no details or explanation.

This ALSO means that you cannot ramble, giving a 10-sentence answer.  

3. Answer the question clearly.

Make sure that you give a clear answer to the question in the first sentence of your answer.

If the question is, “How long should borrowing an object be allowed?” Answer the question clearly right away: “I think it’s okay to borrow something for a few weeks, or a month, tops.”

…and then you can continue speaking for another 2 or 3 sentences.

4. Explain your answer well.

You need to explain your ideas well.

Let’s take the idea from above:  “I think it’s okay to borrow something for a few weeks, or a month, tops.”

You can explain this idea further: “I think it’s important to finish borrowing whatever it is quickly, so that you don’t inconvenience your family member or friend. It’s also important to return it as soon as possible so that you don’t forget to do it later on.”

5. Give an example.

Give an example of your idea, too, which will finish a well-rounded answer

Let’s look at this one: “For example, last year, I borrowed my friend’s book for a few months, and it turned out that she actually needed it for her class; I felt horrible for not returning it.”

Here are the answers to the Part 3 questions from above!

How long should borrowing an object be allowed?

“I think it’s okay to borrow something for a few weeks, or a month, tops. I think it’s important to finish borrowing whatever it is quickly, so that you don’t inconvenience your family member or friend. It’s also important to return it as soon as possible so that you don’t forget to do it later on. For example, last year, I borrowed my friend’s book for a few months, and it turned out that she actually needed it for her class; I felt horrible for not returning it.”

How about more luxurious things?

“In this case, I think you should return a luxurious thing, like a piece of jewelry or dress, even sooner – maybe after a few days. I’m someone who’s always nervous about my belongings, so I think it’s considerate when someone treats my things with respect and returns them quickly. For example, when my sister borrowed my pearl earrings, I was so relieved when she returned them a few days later. That’s why it’s important to return expensive belongings more quickly.”

Are people afraid of borrowing and losing one of these objects?

“Some people are afraid of borrowing and losing things, especially children and teenagers. They’re typically more irresponsible and might worry about losing important things that they’ve borrowed. I think adults are less afraid of borrowing and then losing something because they are more organized and more in control of their things. For example, when I was 17, I was so afraid of borrowing and losing my dad’s keys to his car, but now, I’d have no problem with it.”

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